Chicken Pot Pie

Chicken Pot Pie

4 boneless, skinless Chicken Breast halves; diced
2 (10.5 oz.) cans Cream of Chicken Soup
3 Tbs. Olive Oil
1/2 cup Evaporated Milk
4 cloves Garlic; minced
1 1/2 tsp. Poultry Seasoning
1 Yellow Onion; diced
1 Tbs. Worcestershire
4 medium Potatoes; diced
4 stalks of Celery; diced
2 Carrots; Carrots; diced
Optional: (16 oz.) bag frozen mixed vegetables; thawed
1 can refrigerated Crescent Rolls
salt and black pepper to taste

Heat a 12″ Dutch oven using 20-22 briquettes bottom until hot. To hot oven add bacon grease, chicken and garlic; season with salt and black pepper to taste. Cook chicken stirring frequently until chicken is no longer pink. Add onions and potatoes and continue cooking until onions are translucent but still firm. Stir in mixed vegetables, soup, evaporated milk, poultry seasoning and Worcestershire; season with salt and pepper. Let mixture come to a low boil. Unroll the crescent rolls and create a top crust by layering flat rolls across the top of ingredients.

Reduce the heat on bottom to 8-10 briquettes and add 14-16 briquettes to the lid. Bake for 25-30 minutes until the rolls are golden brown and flaky. Check to make sure potatoes are cooked through. If not, then remove all briquettes from the lid and continue to cook maintaining bottom heat to keep pie bubbling an additional 15 minutes until potatoes are cooked through.

Serves: 6


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    Re-seasoned cast iron cookware

    • First, if you find your cast iron needs to be stripped down and re-seasoned do not fear. All you have to do is place the utensil in your Self Cleaning Oven on the shortest cleaning cycle (usually 3 hrs. on most models), and it will come out looking like the day it came out of the mold. Allow it to cool overnight. Wash the residue off with WATER ONLY in the sink using a stiff abrasive pad. Make certain NO DISH SOAP comes in contact with the utensil during this procedure. If it does you will have to start over!!! Dry the cast iron utensil off with a paper towel, and IMMEDIATELY place BACK in the oven at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for 10 minutes or so.
    • Next, take the utensil out of the oven after the 10 minute drying time is complete, and lightly brush the utensil with a paper towel coated with Crisco or other solid cooking oil. Liquid vegetable oil will do in a pinch, but it's better to save the liquids until AFTER your initial seasoning. It is important in this step only to lightly coat the cast iron with a light, thin coat of oil until it only glistens. Do not allow any puddles or pools of liquid as this will cause problems at a later time.
    • Then, place the Cast Iron in the oven set to 500 to 550 degrees Fahrenheit with the COOKING SIDE FACING THE BOTTOM OF THE OVEN. This allows for any excess oil to drain off to the sides, and prevents pooling during the seasoning process. The higher heating temps allows for the oil to truly 'cook' as it should as opposed to just 'gumming up' at lower temps. Cook undisturbed for 1 hour.
    • Please note: During the previous step it will be best to turn off any smoke alarms in the immediate area as it may smoke quite a lot. Ceiling fans also aid in ventilation.
    • Finally, after your cast iron is finished seasoning for 1 hour or so, take it out of the oven and IMMEDIATELY wipe it down with another extra – light coat of Crisco. Allow it to completely cool.

    Crusty Pan

     

    • For crusty cast ironware that you inherited or picked up at a garage sale: Your cookware may have some combination of rust and thick crackly black crud. It can be restored fairly easily to good as new condition! First place the cookware in a self-cleaning oven and run one cycle OR place in a campfire or directly on a hot charcoal fire for 1/2 hour, until dull red. The crust will be flaking, falling and turning to white ash. Then, after allowing to cool a bit to avoid cracking your cast iron,use the following steps. If you have more rust than crust, try using steel wool to sand it off.
    • Wash your cast iron cookware with warm water and soap using a scouring pad. If you have purchased your cast iron cookware as new then it will be coated in oil or a similar coating to prevent rust. This will need to be removed before seasoning so this step is essential
    • Dry the cookware thoroughly, it helps to put the pan in the oven for a few minutes to make sure it's really dry. Oil needs to be able to soak into the metal for a good seasoning and oil and water don't mix.
       
    • Coat the pot or pan inside and out with lard, Crisco, bacon fat, or corn oil. Ensure that the lid is also coated.
    • Place both the lid and the pot or pan upside down in your oven at 300F for at least an hour to bake on a "seasoning" that protects the pan from rust and provides a stick-resistant surface.
    • For best results repeat steps three and four and five.
    • Ongoing care: Every time you wash your pan, you must season it. Place it on the stove and pour in about 3/4 tsp. corn oil or other cooking fat. Wad up a paper towel and spread the oil across the cooking surface, any bare iron surfaces, and the bottom of the pan. Turn on the burner and heat until smoke starts to appear. Cover pan and turn heat off.

    Tips

     

    • If food burns, just heat a little water in the pan, and scrape with a flat metal spatula. It may mean that re-seasoning is necessary.
    • If you're washing the cast iron too aggressively (for instance with a scouring pad), you will regularly scrub off the seasoning. Wash more gently or repeat oven-seasoning method regularly.
    • If your pan develops a thick crust, you're not washing it aggressively enough. Follow "crusty pan" instructions.
    • If storing your Cast Iron Dutch oven for any length of time, it is always best to place one or two paper towels in between the lid and the oven to allow for air flow.
    • Also, after cleaning after each use it is always best to place it back in the oven on 350 degrees for 10 minutes or so to ensure all water has vaporized and left the surface of the cast iron.

    Warnings

    • Do not cook tomatoes and other acidic foods in your cast iron cookware unless it has been well seasoned.
    • Washing pans with detergent after they have been seasoned will break down the seasoning. Either wash without detergent (if you're cooking similar foods with the pan, this is fine) or repeatedly oven-season your cookware.

    Copied from http://www.wikihow.com/Season-Cast-Iron-Cookware


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      Dad’s Dutch Oven Meatloaf

      3 pounds ground turkey
      2 or 3 slices of bread
      2 eggs
      2 or 3 tbsp Brown Sugar (Homemade Brown Sugar Recipes)

      I don’t measure this stuff, just add what looks good.
      Worcestershire
      Mustard
      BBQ Sauce
      Steak Sauce (57 style)

      Onion Powder
      Ground Cayenne
      Lemon Pepper Seasoning salt
      Poultry Seasoning
      Italian Seasoning
      Seasoned Salt
      Cajun Seasoning
      Black pepper
      Garlic Power
      Cilantro Leaves

      Fresh Bell Pepper Chopped
      Fresh Onion Chopped
      Fresh Garlic diced

      Form meat into a even loaf and Cook at 350 (charcoal quantity will vary due to dutch oven size) for 45 to 60 minutes.


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        Winter has come!

        It was inevitable. The first “real” snowfall has started. We currently are expecting 4-8″ of the fluffly stuff. However, all you do is turn around and that changes.  We are very excited about this. Except maybe the kids. They are homeschooled, so no real snow day for them. We are looking forward to snow angels, snowball fights and hot chocolate this afternoon though. Who wouldn’t be?  We have our Dutch Oven ready, our closet full of camping gear and we are ready for what ever comes our way. Hooray for having 3 Boy Scouts in the family!!

        It always amazes me though how people prepare for upcoming weather. My husband and I were watching the news last night and they were interviewing shoppers.  I laughed at the kinds of things they had in their carts. Applesauce cups, frozen waffles, etc. Not exactly essentials. What happened to cases of canned goods, dried goods and peanut butter?  If the power goes out, are we to just keep our food out in the snow and then tredge in and out all day to gather the  meals? While, of course,  letting out all the precious heat it took us all day to conserve.  I may not be an expert at weather prepardness, but can’t we rethink our misguided notions of what is actually needed if the time comes and buy smart? Or be stoked about the full pantry of food we can’t cook? Hey, I stocked up!


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